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GLYCERINE

TABLES  LI
Specific Gravity of Aqueous Glycerine

469

Specific gravity according to
		Percentage by weight
	;    Specific gravity according to
		;  Percentage bv weight


	
		- -------------- __ ......... _
		
Lenz at 12-14° Water ati2°=i
	Gerlach at 15° Water at 15°= i
	of          ;
 Glycerine.     Lenz at I2~I4C Water at 12°= i
		Gerlach at 15° .Vaterat 15-= i
	of Glycerine.

1-2691 1-2664 1-2637
	1-2653 1-2628 1-2602
	TOO
 99 98
	1-2212 1-2185
 1-2159
	1-2184 1-2157 1-2130
	8.!
 Si
 So

1-2610 1-2584
	1-2577 1-2552
	'        97 96
	1-2016 1-1889
	1-1990 1-1850
	75
 70

1-2557
	1-2526
	95
	1-1733
	1-1711
	65

1-2531
	1-2501
	94
	1-1582
	1-1570
	60

I -2504 1-2478
	1-2476 1-2451
	93 92
	1-1455
 1-1320
	I-I430 1-1290
	55 50

1-2451
	1-2425
	91
	1-1183
	1-1155
	45

1-2425
	1-2400
	9°
	1-1045
	I-IO2O
	40

1-2398
	1-2373
	89               :             I-O907
		1-0885
	35

1-2372
	1-2346
	88        i       1-0771
		1-0750
	30

1-2345
	1-2319
	87               1-0635             1-0620
			

1-2318
	1-2292
	86               1-0498
		1-0490
	20

1-2292
	1-2265
	85        |       1-0374
		----
	I5

1-2265
	1-2238
	84               1-0245
		1-0245
	10

1-2238
	I-22II
	83        i      1-0123
		----
	5

(c)   i c.c. of the glycerine and i c.c. of ammonia are heated to 60°
and 3 drops of silver nitrate solution then added :   the appearance of a
brown coloration or deposit within 5 minutes denotes the presence of acrokin
or formic acid.

(d)   I c.c. is heated with i c.c. of 15% sodium hydroxide solution:
evolution of ammonia indicates the presence of ammonium salts, or yellowing
of the solution the presence of glucose.   The presence of the latter may be
confirmed by boiling a few drops of the glycerine with Fehling's solution
(red precipitate).

(e)   i c.c. is heated gently with dilute sulphuric acid to ascertain if
an unpleasant rancid odour is evolved (fatty substances] ; the liquid is then
neutralised and boiled with Fehling's solution (sugar}.

(/) i volume of the glycerine is treated with about 2 vols. of strong
alcohol: turbidity denotes presence of gum or dextrin.

(g) A few c.c. of the glycerine are evaporated in a small dish to ascer-
tain if any residue remains (usually mineral substances).

3.  Chlorides.—A known weight of the glycerine is carefully burnt, the
residue charred at a low temperature and lixiviated with water and the
chlorine in the solution determined volumetrically.   The result is expressed
as sodium chloride.

4.   Nitration Test (for dynamite glycerine);—Into a very wide beaker,
150 grams of nitrating mixture (i part by weight of nitric acid of D = 1-5salts.